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Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Ecology, and Conservation :: View topic - Help with behaviour! Male bird might be female?
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Help with behaviour! Male bird might be female?

 
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FanTheHammer
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Joined: Jun 30, 2017
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:57 am    Post subject: Help with behaviour! Male bird might be female?

I've had Funnyboy since march and he has been fun to watch and makes some cute noises. However!

He bites. Hard. Really hard. Finger. Ear, side of my face, my arm. He has such a cute face as he does it too. I've read the advice on these forums already and will try being a little more stern with him.

Anyway, today he showed some..interesting behaviour. It looks very...female to me? So maybe his.. [ or her? ] biting is a hormonal thing. Here's a video of him or her doing..the strange thing.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/o6cxagk2z28yij7/20170629_154710.mp4?dl=0

Have attached a picture too!



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kiki2112
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Joined: May 21, 2017
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2017 7:18 am    Post subject:

wouldn't worry about it tbh , once you have been "savaged" off a African grey or 2 , its nothing Laughing
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Steptoe
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2017 9:35 am    Post subject:

Note the larger beak.. larger, male check under the wing, a broken pale yellow line male.. solid female

Biting is not natural other than checking out is something is eatable..more of a strong nibble.
But If they have been checking out say a finger, that finger pulled away... from THEIR perspective, like playing with a kitten with a bit of paper on the end of a string.... biting becomes an encouraged game.
So basically they have been unintentionally trained to do so.

The exception to this, and applies to cats dogs to some extent depending on the breed.... Usually the female pet attaches its self to the male person in the family, and becomes jealous/ possessive of anyone who may threaten that relationship...and visa versa.

Or defensive.. say taking a bird from the wild and training down. We did so with mature wild sulphur crested cockatoos....Within 3 to 4 days biting stopped...7 to 10 days trained to sit on the forearm.

Biting can be trained out.. make use of the Quick Search block on the left.

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FanTheHammer
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 01, 2017 7:56 am    Post subject:

Steptoe wrote:
Note the larger beak.. larger, male check under the wing, a broken pale yellow line male.. solid female

Biting is not natural other than checking out is something is eatable..more of a strong nibble.
But If they have been checking out say a finger, that finger pulled away... from THEIR perspective, like playing with a kitten with a bit of paper on the end of a string.... biting becomes an encouraged game.
So basically they have been unintentionally trained to do so.

The exception to this, and applies to cats dogs to some extent depending on the breed.... Usually the female pet attaches its self to the male person in the family, and becomes jealous/ possessive of anyone who may threaten that relationship...and visa versa.

Or defensive.. say taking a bird from the wild and training down. We did so with mature wild sulphur crested cockatoos....Within 3 to 4 days biting stopped...7 to 10 days trained to sit on the forearm.

Biting can be trained out.. make use of the Quick Search block on the left.


Hi! What about the behaviour in the video? Is this something I should ignore in future or is petting okay?
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Steptoe
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 01, 2017 11:26 am    Post subject:

Srt couldn't get to the file yesterday.. got it now.

The behaviour s typical of a pet bird/ parrot...
The little chirps are similar but not the same as a female with mating tenancies .. Rather those more of a young bird being weaned off.
I suspect if the bird is older , it has been hand reared which sort puts a sort of the adult tenancies to the back burning. This also includes being able/ 'having the knowledge' to raise chicks once hatched after a couple generations of hand rearing.

Great advantage to have the bird to this stage of tame/ trust. Makes dealing with the biting issues so much easier to deal with, being able to step up the aggressiveness of the re training and not lose trust.
Not thu being male, and attached to th female of the house, biting/ getting intimidating with males of the household is very difficult to sort.. if can be in the end, at all.
Reduced to some extent, but this is when they get more sneaky. All will be good, they will fain 'affection' to get to a vulnerable position.. say near a ear... then CHOMP.

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