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Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Ecology, and Conservation :: View topic - Release a Kakariki back into the wild.
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Release a Kakariki back into the wild.
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Harriet
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2011 1:54 pm    Post subject: Release a Kakariki back into the wild.

angel hi all, I have a female pied, and would like to release her back into the wild. But I am in Australia, so I guess she would have to go back to NZ, as it probably would not work here, she needs her own kind.

Any comments?

Harriet from Brisbane, Australia



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Steptoe
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2011 5:00 pm    Post subject:

Kakariki are an endangered species on the CITES list...
The Aust Government would give permission but the NZ gov will not, even thu the muation genes are natural in the wild, we no longer have them.

We cant even release of even give them to conservation project in NZ ..for free..even thu pure breed (not hybrid and dna deases checked)
We have to have special permits, cant keep as a pet and need special rediculus conditions to keep them
Add to that under the wildlife act we cant even sell them...
So what do we do with our captive native birds, reptiles, fish etc....we dig a hole and chop their heads off.
That is the law.....
I have 3 pair coming into their 4 th yr of breeding , produced over 130 healthy adults each...these have then been put into a flock with established social structures....then dug a hole and chopped their heads off.

I was at the NZ Federation of Bird Clubs Annual national show a month or so ago...looking around a huge resource of very experianced people breeding exotic species....So asked many of them
"IF the Dept of Conservation gave you and asked u to breed a particular endangered species for release would you do it for free?"
I got 2 answers
1/ " Hell yeah"
2/" well Im a pensioner and could not afford the seed"
"IF DoC gave u a $50 sack of seed every now and then"
"Hell yeah"

So the question is why are damn near every one of our native birds, reptiles, fish, snail, worms, snalls on the endangered or All risk list?

Way Does DoC wait till a species is on the at risk list ..then panics , gets quite a few million extra dollars of tax payer money to spend over the next 10 to 20 yrs to get the species back to just endangered???
Why does DoC have to spend millions when their are very highly experianced breeders all around NZ....and in most cases very successfully breed rare and endangered species from other countries instead !!!

I have to date killed (polite culled) around a 1000 NZ endangered kakariki.

Is this not a sick situation?

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Harriet
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2011 11:36 pm    Post subject: thanks Steptoe for the info, but I dont quite understand--

I am new to looking after a Kakariki, (still learning to spell it) and do you mean to say, you are breeding and then killing them off? wall
Harriet
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Harriet
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2011 11:42 pm    Post subject: breeding

This little female has so far produced 9 eggs and is faithfully sitting on them so hoping and expecting them to hatch, it is so sad. It is just her, so no male to fertilise so no chance, and really anyway, I dont want a heap of birds to look after, so we will just have to weather it out!

Does anyone have any suggestions? should I keep removing some of the eggs? I think she is getting quite frustrated and has been flying around the house looking for a new nest, which i suppose, she thinks, will bring her some better luck! /so far i have removed 4 eggs, and her nest now has another 5 eggs in it. I think I should probably remove 3 so she is back down to 2 again.

Harriet
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Steptoe
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2011 12:56 am    Post subject:

Quote:
I am new to looking after a Kakariki, (still learning to spell it) and do you mean to say, you are breeding and then killing them off?

Sort of Im saying anyone, who is a private breeder/holder of NZ native animals..birds what ever in NZ is required to do so...
Privatebreeders are able to breed damn near in bulk..if u excuse the terminlogy..damn near free of charge to the tax payer...yet instead DoC choose to spend millions, pack out staff to produce a small fraction of what we can.

This behavour is rather foreign to me ...We have never had a female lay eggs without a males present ...we dont and not allowed to keep kakariki in a cage or as pets..only in suitable flights/avairies.
We also do not incubate or hand raise our birds....
I strongly think... have a therory that hand raised birds tend to have more of an affinty to bond as a mate to their owners ..where as avairy raised dont tend to do so.

I base this opinion on many posts/threads in the last 9/10 yrs in these forums having this issue and the common denomiator is caged/hand raised pets and our own observations in our avairies.

We do breed exoctic birds also, kings, crimson wing , burkes , turqs etc.
Hand raising is a lot of work...the bird when weaned is very tame, but looses a lot of its natural instincts behavours, even over several generations the abilty to nest and care/raise young.
It is not difficult to take a wild adult parrot of many yrs out of the wild and tame down..and easier to tame a weaned young avariy breed parrot.
These birds one tends to co habit with when kept as house parrots...they are not de natured enough to be real 'cuddly ' toys, keep their identity natural personality and not prone to pscotic behavour and feather plucking, and are far more hardy and dease resistant, and much larger birds.
Sry very long sentance

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RoboHip
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2011 1:55 am    Post subject:

May I ask why you want to release her into the wild?

The eggs will not hatch - as there is no male to have fertilised them. You can let her sit and she will give up after a priod of time.

Other options are remove the eggs and rearrage everything in her cage, reduce daylight hours also will help to bring her out of condition
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pabloc
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2011 4:56 am    Post subject:

Harriet,

if you release a kakariki in the wild, esp. a lone bird... it has all odds of not lasting longer than a couple of hours maybe.
They are not shy or flighty birds, and they spend a lot of time on the ground so it wouldn't take long for a cat or a prey bird to get hold of a kakariki.
It may make you feel better, but in fact you are doing the animal no favor at all.

And of course releasing a captive bird outside its natural habitat is a big mistake, as it can become a pest (for instance like indian ringnecks and monk parakeets).

I love this sentence:
Quote:
"You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed"


We must think before we accept the commitment of looking after an animal.

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Steptoe
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2011 8:52 am    Post subject:

on the right hand side of the front page when lgeed in u will see a link to member list...
Contact a couple of Aussie members...cattscapes or wyranda they may very well be intersted in your bird or even swap it for a male.
A lady should have a male pet and visa versa for a man....pets bond better that way...ad males dont have this issue.

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Harriet
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2011 2:27 pm    Post subject: thank you all for your help.

I have inherited Harriet, not really liking to keep birds in a cage, but as you say, the cage birds do not stand much of a chance in the wild.

I think the suggestion to just let her sit is a good idea and she will get over it eventually. I will take out a couple of eggs when she is out flying around and I would think that is more comfortable for her, than trying to sit on 4 eggs at once. What does any one think?

Harriet went besurk at one stage, and after some investigation, with her flapping around the room and back to the nest and taking off again, all the time, making lots of loud noises, I checked her nest and one egg was broken. After removing that, she was happy and back to her old self. Just went straight into the nest and commenced sitting once again. They are a funny little bird!

I have sent some emails to breeders in Brisbane, so will see what eventuates.
thanks all again
Harriet



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pabloc
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2011 10:14 pm    Post subject:

Harriet,
very funny what you ssay about the broken egg

About keeping birds in a cage... I used to feel somehow guilty of depriving animals of their freedom, then you eventually think things thru, and realize it's part of human nature to tame animals, not just for food, but also for company.
We make a big effort to understand the behavior of our cats, dogs, etc... but I think many times we forget to try to understand our own behaviors and insticts.

Cheers / Pablo

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Steptoe
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2011 9:35 am    Post subject:

Captive animals depends on the conditions of capitivty and care.
They can live like a lot...well most if we look at human history... people quite happy to go between work, home and local pub for generations and never go outside their village
Or they can live in a prison on bread and water
There is a huge difference between the 2.

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Cattscapes
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 7:40 pm    Post subject:

Hey Steps if i was in New Zealand i would pretend they were homing pidgeons and i would be letting them out all over the country. Or opps i left the aviary door open. Your government rules are crap. But i think you know that.
Cheers Kev
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Steptoe
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 9:45 am    Post subject:

Well when one doesnt accept thecurrent policies and is vocal and we need permits, then everything must be done by the book from condition of flights to diet etc etc....If ones creditabity is not their in situations like this, the whole protest 'falls apart.
And release into the wild by some is a great concern to me....althu since we have been hammering hybrids over the last 10 yrs and hopefully now most of the capitive stock is pure bred (Ithink)now how much damage has been done with hybrids that have been released???
DoC had a grandfathering policy going back to the 60s to remove hybrids from the capitive stock...trouble is/was most DoC ppl and breeders didnt know what was what...
I I have the old logs from late 60s to mid 80s of a DoC permit inspector...which shows that policy did not work...hence my stand if hybrid, instant cull. no discussion for all species of NZ native animals.
Then there is the issue of beak and feather....well its now known its been in the wild for many decades now...and when one can breed and release exotic game birds with no dease checks, no permits , no checks etc
It all becomes very hypicrital.
On one hand they talk science yet on the other there is no science or even common sence to policy to substantualte claims.

There is only one word that comes to mind
Stupidity
Or
Protectiing their job statis at the expense of conservation....hypcorasy.

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Atkins
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 7:05 pm    Post subject:

We live up north around Kaitaia and almost every day I see at least one or two Rosellas flying around. Out in the country you can see sometimes up to 6 birds flying. Its amazing how the Aussies do over here, yet the kiwi birds are so governed by bureaucracy. I have a large 8mx4m aviary, How do I go about getting a permit to breed Kakarikis?
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Wiccawolf
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2014 5:56 am    Post subject: Ref Kakariki laying issue

I have had several Kaks to this point. I have seen the issue you are having Hariett and sought help from my vet who specializes in birds. he advised me that this is a common issue with caged females, specially those who have bonded with their human companions. He advised me to allow the hen to sit for the term of the eggs ( 21-28 days ). In most cases this will "fool" the hen's hormones into thinking her job has been done. In many cases after this time the hen will either abandon the eggs, or will consume them to recover the nutrients. She may begin to look for another nest, which most of my birds with this issue have done, but usually after a short sebatical. My birds are generally caged, but have extended periods of time which they can exercise outside of their cage. I keep wings trimmed so they can fly, but not very well. It allows them to get their flight exercise but still makes it easier for me to corral them when necessary. Nesting boxes or platforms are only accessible from within their home cage. Any eggs laid outside of their box are immediately moved to the box and the hen shown where they are. So far this has had favorable results in my flock. Also avoid scratching your hen on their lower back, as this simulates treading and only compounds the problem.
Hope this helps
Wolf
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