Welcome to Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Diet, Health, Aviaries and Conservation!
Ask Questions, Find Answers and DiscussionsKakariki Member Pics, Mutation/Species IdentificationInformation on Permits, Research Papers etcLinks to Other Sites and InformationYour A/C Details, Messages

     GT Modules
· Home
· Forums
· Recommend Us
· Email Webmaster
Email Webmaster for any problems with Registering, the site and General Enquires
·Link to Us, Details
Set to your default home page· Set Home page


       QuickSearch
Search Forums
for key Words
Advanced Search
 Search  Words

     NZ Conservation Projects


DoC / NZ Conservation Sites


New Zealand Brown Teal (Pateke)
Kiwi House and Native Bird Park
Parrot Society of New Zealand
Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society of New Zealand
New Zealand Conservation Management Group


Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Diet, Health, Aviaries and Conservation: Forums

Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Ecology, and Conservation :: View topic - Losing Weight, Various Infections, Losing Feathers
 Forum FAQForum FAQ    SearchSearch     Log inLog in/Register  

Losing Weight, Various Infections, Losing Feathers

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Ecology, and Conservation Forum Index -> Vets Corner
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Teddscau
Member
Member


Joined: Mar 19, 2017
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 12:12 pm    Post subject: Losing Weight, Various Infections, Losing Feathers

Hi everyone. I'm sorry for not being on the forum more. Anyways, I adopted my two yellow colour mutation red-fronted kākāriki, Tiki and Ria, last March. Their weights were in the 40g range when I adopted them from the shelter, their muscles were atrophied, they were malnourished, their nails were overgrown, they were suffering from bacterial infections, Ria's eye was being pushed out of the socket due to pus from untreated sinusitis...

Anyways, their avian vet and I have been putting a lot of effort into helping them recover. They've gotten a lot better after several treatments of antibiotics, antiparasitics (mites and lice), lots of nuts and sunflower seeds to fatten them up, plenty of baths, better nutrition (although I haven't been able to give them enough vegetables lately), and an indoor mixed species aviary for them to live in (they live with six budgies and a parrotlet).

However, Tiki's health has really started to deteriorate. He's lost a lot of weight (he went from 64g to only 57g in two months), he's lost quite a few feathers on the top of his head and has bald patches on it that aren't regrowing any feathers, the skin on his head is really dry, his heartbeat is muffled (we don't know what's causing it because he's too sick at the moment to have X-rays done), he's lost strength, he's been sneezing and gagging a lot, his ventriculus is distended (the vet thinks something's pushing on it)... He and Ria have been put on antibiotics and antifungal medication, and they've been on it since Saturday. Ria also had some blood taken since she's been having what appears to be focal seizures.

I need advice on what I should be feeding them to help them get better. They've been eating really well, but they're losing weight because of persistent infections. I know a lot of you are breeders and would probably just have them euthanized, but almost all of my companion animals are rescues. I knew Tiki and Ria were unhealthy as soon as I met them, and I really want to nurse them back to health. They were rescued from a hoarding situation only to end up at an animal shelter that knew nothing about birds. Because of the staff at the shelter, my poor kākāriki were almost dead when I adopted them.
Back to top
Steptoe
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: Oct 06, 2004
Posts: 4529

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:05 am    Post subject:

Quote:
I know a lot of you are breeders and would probably just have them euthanized, but almost all of my companion animals are rescues.

Kakariki have a very small captive gene pool.. with captive species it is very important to remove, even ifb suspect, defective birds in case the defect is genetic rather than 'sick'
Other species .. like budgies dont have the same restrictive gene pool
Hope that puts things into better perspective.

So fingers crossed the issues dont stem from a genetic issue...
Kakariki are .. would be one of the most hardy of birds.. and if sick, tend to recover very well without regressing..

Quote:
he's been sneezing and gagging a lot,

looked/swabbed for crop worms??

You and the vet seem to be doing all the right things..
except
1/ sick birds not isolated from general flocks...
2/ introduce apple cider vinegar into their veggies/ fruit, and even into the water. A maintenance mist spray of the aviary/ flight/ cage of 50/50 soln vinegar and water.. damped all surfaces and have the birds fly tru the mist, dont spray directly on them.
Do this as general maintenance every 4 to 6 weeks, and after cleaning out cages.
3/ try and introduce foods higher in sulphur, zinc and magnesium. or even health tablets crushed down a very light sprinkle on food once a week
4/ 70% RAW palm oil 30% olive mix a spoon mixed over a 5 days of chopped veggies kept in the fridge
5/ give then fresh mint leaves on a regular basis , every few days.. or include to the chopped veggies

Long claws on kakariki.. do not compare them with other species.. kakariki have longer than normal claws... also the will chew excessively long claws off.

With sign of recovery then deterioration, Im tending to go for genetic defects... if the above doesnt show positive signs in a week or 2, I would be going genetic defects.
You will also notice a huge improvement in the colour and well being of the other birds, and things like mites/ worms will be a thing of the past... even with dirt floors.

_________________
My Spelling is Not Incorrect...It's 'Creative'
Back to top
Michelle
Member
Member


Joined: Nov 22, 2017
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 3:22 am    Post subject:

Hi everyone! I'm new to this forum as well as to owning a kakariki. Got mine a month ago. Except for a little patch, barely noticeable behind his left eye, his feathers were fine. Now, almost his whole chest is bare, also on his back (not as much as the chest) and around the neck. All this moulting started a few days after I got him and just earlier he was not able to sit on his right leg, he would raise it and hold it together vertically, not like in a fist.. as if caused by a cramp.. He is very energetic, active, he's got a big cage, almost like an indoor aviary, but has free roam of my studio most of the time.
He was on seeds diet, but after I got him I introduced him to veggies and fruits. For veggies I tried kale, spinach, salad, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, peas, corn, cauliflower, tomatoes but he would only eat broccoli, peas and lately mainly corn. Fruits I tried: apple, banana, kiwi, mango, blueberries, mandarin and raspberries but he only eats the last two. He still has various seed mixes.
I have sprayed his veggies with apple cider vinegar mixed with water, put some in his water as well. Just got him the Johnson feathers spray that I read about on here, as is easier to spray on a bird that would not allow me to touch, rather then chase him in his big cage to put Invermectin on.
Please advise what I should do.. I'll attach a picture of him (or might be a her, don't know really).
Any help would be highly appreciated!



IMG_2020 (1).JPG
 Description:
 Filesize:  63.03 KB
 Viewed:  8 Time(s)

IMG_2020 (1).JPG


Back to top
Teddscau
Member
Member


Joined: Mar 19, 2017
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 6:10 am    Post subject:

I find budgies (or at least a disproportionate number of my budgies) suffer from genetic issues. My one girl, Alice, died this May from cancer, and she would've been three this Halloween. I think it's the yellow and white (albino, clearwing, etc.) colour mutations mainly, along with the show budgies.

We actually haven't actually checked for crop worms (I contacted the vet about gape worms yesterday), so we'll definitely be checking into that. She doesn't work with poultry, so she didn't think to look into it.

Yeah, and I know they should've been kept in quarantine, but because the first two vets who treated them (the vet at the shelter and then the local vet) didn't exactly handle their case properly, all of my other birds have already been exposed to everything the kākāriki might have (I did initially quarantine them for over a month, but two different vets said they weren't contagious...).

The vet (the third vet they've seen thus far) phoned this morning to tell me that Ria has low blood calcium. I guess I was giving them too much Swiss chard and spinach to them this summer. I just ordered bentonite clay (calcium), a vitamin E supplement, and a B-complex supplement for everyone.

Is there a reason to use a solution of vinegar and water to clean the aviary rather than my bird-safe disinfectant? You guys are the experts when it comes to kākāriki, so I'm just curious.

As for the sulphur, zinc, and magnesium, do kākāriki have higher dietary requirements for these minerals than other species? If anything, too much of these minerals are a concern for most parrot species, not a lack thereof.

Oh, and thanks for the suggestion of palm oil. I was actually thinking of buying it for them to get them to gain weight, but I wasn't 100% sure. Also, once they're better, should I still continue to give them food with palm oil on it? From what I've been reading about kākāriki, they tend to be a bit underweight in captivity, so I guess I'd probably keep giving it to them?

Thanks for reminding me about the aromatic herbs! I keep reading on here about how they should be included as a part of their diet, but thus far I've failed to do so. I'll definitely have to go out to buy some fresh herbs, and I'll definitely grow a pot of herbs for them next summer (it's currently winter in my part of the world).

I really hope their problems aren't genetic, but odds are...

Tiki's head flicking was worse this morning, and he was getting small droplets of clear liquid on me while I was restraining him while medicating him (I really suck at holding birds properly -_-). He'll see the vet early next week, so hopefully we'll be able to get a better idea of what's happening by doing x-rays and illuminating his throat for worms. Anyways, thanks for all the advice!
Back to top
Teddscau
Member
Member


Joined: Mar 19, 2017
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:57 am    Post subject:

Oh, and as for their nails being too long, they actually were. I know kākāriki are supposed to have long nails, but my pair kept getting their nails caught on things and were having a lot of difficulty walking and perching because their nails were so long. The one day, I walked into the indoor aviary and there was blood all over the place. I guess Tiki had broke one of his nails, and he lost an unbelievable amount of blood. Honestly, he should've passed out from all the blood he'd lost (there was so much blood!).

Michelle, as for your boy, I'm concerned about his flight feathers. They look wavy, which isn't good. I'm concerned about potential nutritional deficiencies with him. I'd definitely buy some Nekton-S vitamins online for him, as well as Clay-Cal or a similar product for calcium.

As for antiparasitic medicine (for external parasites), I'd definitely recommend using some sort of topical medication, and not just a spray. I know it's hard to catch birds (only one out of my nine birds is step up trained), but if you do it at night when it's dark and the lights are out, he won't be able to see you trying to grab him. It's a pain in the butt having to medicate small parrots or transporting them to the vet, but it's so much easier to do it if it's dark, since most parrots can't see in the dark. Also, to wouldn't be a bad idea to take him to a certified avian vet to have blood work done on him to check for any signs of infection, low blood calcium, liver enzymes, etc. It'll cost more than a few dollars, but it's worth it. Otherwise, we wouldn't have known Tiki was suffering from a bad infection when I first brought my pair home (I thought he was just really emaciated and malnourished).
Back to top
Steptoe
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: Oct 06, 2004
Posts: 4529

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 11:54 am    Post subject:

Teddscau

Quote:
phoned this morning to tell me that Ria has low blood calcium.

Low Ca dosent always mean lack Ca in the diet.. more often than not it is an in balance of diet/ nutrients.
ie for iron to be absorbed there needs to be vit C for Ca to be absorbed there needs to be phosphorus ( broccoli stems chopped up..)
And there is a common misconception that shell, and other common Ca based things ... usually based on different forms of Calcium carbonates ) plaster paris.. set.. concrete , cement chalk all different forms.
We used use Ca tablet I use when donating blood/ plasma/ platelets to stop lip tingles and light headedness .. little crushed up and in the veggies.. now just chopped up cooked chicken bone , chop bones, and gristle cartilage and pumice sand on the floors.
Quote:
Is there a reason to use a solution of vinegar and water to clean the aviary rather than my bird-safe disinfectant? You guys are the experts when it comes to kākāriki, so I'm just curious.

No reason why not..its just that when cleaning one then rinsed everything including dirt and the vinegar way.. which would then mean having to ' re vinegar ' Ideally everything is dry, wooden perches etc.. then spray with the vinegar, its absorbed deeper into porous surfaces.

Quote:
As for the sulphur, zinc, and magnesium, do kākāriki have higher dietary requirements for these minerals than other species?

Kakariki in the wild have a higher protein diet than most other parrots..
Rather than going down the fiddly, expensive route of additives, simply supply a CONSISTANT and VARIED diet.
Find the sticky thread "What do you feed...?

Quote:
they tend to be a bit underweight in captivity, so I guess I'd probably keep giving it to them?

As you will have found out, kakariki are very active bird, on the go all the time, lost energy to burn.. the issue is not tend to get over weight, but more of dont get exercise.. they need space, regular fly time and lots of it..

Quote:
buy some fresh herbs,
most herbs are weeds and grow like that, espec mint..[/quote]
Drop in a a pot on the kitchen window shelf...

Quote:
and he lost an unbelievable amount of blood.

keep a few silver iodide sticks in the fridge.. chat to your vet on that.. failing that , pur a little kerosene or lamp oil over, or a little flour.
PS kerosene/ lamp oil and extremely effective old school bush remedy if wound , cut open yourself in the bush.. stops bleeding and infection plus heals up real fast.. I still do so IT DOESNT STING ...
also excellent old school for children nits.. dip comb in comb or brush thru the hair.. doesnt take much , and leave for 30 mins.. or till end of the day..

Quote:
I'm concerned about potential nutritional deficiencies

much is made of nutritional additives and even more money made from marketing propaganda creating that concern.

Bottom line.. 20 odd birds in terrible state, totally naked , malnourished.. yes this is real... put in a isolated flight, couple drops invermectin on the back of the head , repeat 2 more time at 10 day intervals.
Flight prepared , clean and vinegar sprayed etc.
Fresh seed mix, water with apple cider vinegar, little on veggies every 3 or 4 days... a few quality cat biscuits crushed up in the veggies...throw in a few herbs, mint thyme basel parsley.
mix up antibiotics in a little butter .. they like butter so measured doses at regular intervals for 10 days.. cleaned up secondary eye infections etc
We had to put down 3 of the birds.. they where just to far gone.. rest all recovered well.. and several became critical breeders
Dont over complicate things, you will end up on a merry go round fixing fix ups...


Michelle
It is very important that you get a good net, not too big, take a deep breath , get a clear plan in your head and decide, I am going to catch this bird 1st time. A little secret is to momently distract them with the other hand, then sweep in with the net close, to just infront and above.
You WILL NEED to be able to catch your birds at some point.. learn to do it now and get the bird used to it... NOW.
Its about thinking it thru, out thinking the bird, and deciding not to "try " but decide what is going to happen and make it happen.
ppl Who "try" even "try their best " never actually do it.. hence the term "trying ppl"
think of it this way.. you have the brain, the arms , hands the net, the physical ability..the know how... you have just illogically convinced yourself you ant make it happen.
Your bird need the invermectin on the back of the neck, and at least 1 repeat in 7 to 10 days.

_________________
My Spelling is Not Incorrect...It's 'Creative'
Back to top
Michelle
Member
Member


Joined: Nov 22, 2017
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:05 pm    Post subject:

Hi Teddscau and Steptoe and thank you both for your advise.
I have ordered Invermectin online and should be here on 4-6 December. I got one for small birds, for up to 50gr as the medium for up to 250gr seemed a bit too big. Do not have an aviary vet within walking/public transportation distance (I don't drive..) of where I live or at least not close enough for comfort to transport my bird. As for catching him, I know it is easier to catch them in the dark, I was just hoping this to be my last resort, for the purpose of not stressing him, but health comes first and I WILL do it, one way or another, once the medicine is delivered. I have had budgies in the past, but never had any health issues with them and they were all on seeds diet as they would not eat anything else (and I did feed them veggies and fruits that would just go bad in their cage..).
His leg issue is gone, might have been because he had just woken up from his nap, if that makes any sense, probably just like ppl have sometimes..
As for his diet, I'm not happy with him just having corn/peas and sometimes lately just a little bit of broccoli, seems a bit too much starch. Have put in a small mint leaves 'branch', he nibbled on it a bit without getting anything and walked away..Sad And from the seeds, he's mostly picking up the sunflower seeds. Should I trust him this is what he needs at the moment and keep feeding him varied veggies/fruits/seeds and allow the waist hoping the time comes when he will feel the need for the rest as well? His poop is between light brown and white (probably after the seeds) and medium green with white (after veggies) with the occasional pee in. Looked for anything moving within it (with my eyes, not microscope) but didn't notice anything...signlol
Teddscau, I hope your Tiki and Ria get better soon, please let us know! Wink
Thank you so much in advance for your assistance and support! I will keep you updated and most likely will come back for more advise! This is the only great site/forum I was able to find on kakarikis, please keep it up! Applause
Back to top
Michelle
Member
Member


Joined: Nov 22, 2017
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:48 pm    Post subject:

Btw, for a little bit of history: I got him/her from an online add site for birds. Was told he was a male, 6 months old and that the owner was going off to college and did not have time for him (did he not know this before he got him/her??). The cage was brand new, finished putting it up just 10 min before he/she was brought in. Once he/she gets better, hope you will help me identify the gender, just in case I'd be thinking of getting a partner of same sex, as I do not want them to breed :)
Here's a picture next day after I got him/her.. Could this have been caused by the change in diet or what..?? Or whatever parasites present before have been showing signs after I got him/her?!



IMG_1803.JPG
 Description:
 Filesize:  47.7 KB
 Viewed:  4 Time(s)

IMG_1803.JPG


Back to top
Steptoe
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: Oct 06, 2004
Posts: 4529

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:27 pm    Post subject:

[quote](and I did feed them veggies and fruits that would just go bad in their cage..).
Quote:


Read the thread on " what do you feed..."
Dont mix fruit and veggies...
Chop veggies up, feed once a day the amount they want
See what they are eating and not eating, can alter to suit the seasons.. it changes. When feeding a varied diet constantly they tend to eat what is needed ....except seed, they will eat the sunflower 1st, hold back on re filling let them eat lot of the other seed.
A kakariki parent raised, on healthy veggie fruit meat etc, will consume 4 to 5 time more than seed.. ends up very little seed.
Keep in mind they evolved in a non mammal forest environment, not grass and sunflowers..
Veggies is basically all the stuff you throw out when cooking.. the potato peelings , cali , broccoli stems, tops of radish, carrots , carrot tips ends and peelings.. the left over meat bones gristle, left over peas, beans.
veggies is your apple/ pair cores, the peelings.

And very important . exercise.. never clip a kakariki wings..or any bird for that matter

poop.. well the vinegar/ apple cider vinegar takes care of worms mites long term, the invermectin both short term.. mint, and lot stuff like that , they dont eat.. but chew up store in the back of the mouth then use it.. the oils to mix with the oils out of their oil sack to prune feathers and supply natural anti insect/ mite prevention to the feathers/ skin.
There is thread with photos of worm eggs , how to float off poo samples and see / check under a basic children's elcheapo microscope

Make a lot of use of the "Quick Search" block on the left.
includes diet how to get your bird back in the cage, taming , what to do if flys outside, how to prepare your bird in case it does fly out side, how to turn your bird into a permanent house parrot (only goes back to the cage to eat sleep and poo)

Quote:
This is the only great site/forum I was able to find on kakarikis, please keep it up!

Thankyou. it has been built up over the yrs , and initially but some of the best , most knowledgeable kakariki ppl here in NZ , Germany, Belgium, Sth Africa, Australia and Spain And a lot of co operative trialling, sharing info , methods, international visits and private communications visits

your bird looks like a male...larger beak..check under the wing for a undefined yellow stripe.. females are well defined... have a look thru the gallery and other threads on male female .. lots pics..and info

PS we only have a couple kakariki left now.. been down sizing over last few yrs.
Retirement coming up.. means new life style.. work at want to do, and when, sell off the vintage and classic American muscle cars spend more time with grandchildren and fishing/ diving in the boat with my wife and friends.
Cheers
Steps

_________________
My Spelling is Not Incorrect...It's 'Creative'
Back to top
Teddscau
Member
Member


Joined: Mar 19, 2017
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2017 9:33 am    Post subject:

Apparently bentonite clay has been used for hundreds of years by aboriginals as a dietary supplement, for absorbing toxins, and for healing.

I'll definitely have to try giving them some bones, but the only problem is, we never get hormone- or antibiotic-free meat (from what I understand, meat in New Zealand is way less toxic than North American meat). I'll really have to work on giving them a more varied diet, it's just that I have to buy large quantities of each veggie at a time -_-. I guess I'll have to start cooking tons of different dishes for us humans... Oh, I also have a grow light, so I can grow a bunch of different foods for them this winter! Ooh, I need to grow cape gooseberries!

Oh, we did just buy a bag of dried raw food for the dogs! It has antibiotic- and growth hormone-free lamb (muscle meat, liver, heart, and ground bone), squash, carrots, sweet potato, kale, parsley, broccoli, parsnips, spinach, extra virgin olive oil, and kelp. That would probably be good for the kākāriki, eh? However, the lamb is raw, so I'll probably fry it in a bit of olive oil to kill any potential parasites.

Oh, and I definitely know that kākāriki are extremely active, just not my pair. My pair is less active than even my handicapped budgie. Tiki and Ria are definitely a lot more active than when I got them, and they sometimes fly from one end of the aviary to the other for fun, but they're just not healthy enough yet.

As for kerosene, I'm not sure where one would even purchase such a thing. Also, I don't think my vet would approve of using it with birds Wink. I find cornstarch works fairly well to get the bleeding to stop (assuming I'm there when the incident occurs). Fudge, I just remembered I had to cover Ria's foot in it a while back because a bully attacked her. Luckily, the bully isn't hurting them anymore. Should I just keep the kākāriki in the double-flight cage until they're done their medicine? That way, that fat little budgie can't chase them, but it also means the kākāriki can't fly around. Know what? I think I'll keep them in the cage so I can make sure they eat an adequate amount of the veggies, fruit, dog food, etc., that I give them. I don't need them filling up on pellets (Totally Organic Pellets and Goldn'obles III). Okay, it definitely sounds bad that I'm going to feed them dog food, but it's a raw food diet for dogs, so no animal byproduct meal or added vitamins or anything like that.

I gave them the following food at 2 pm: peas, corn, tomato, cucumber, green pepper, mandarin orange with peel, romaine, broccoli, sesame seeds, mustard seeds, sprouted lentils, sprouted mung beans, sprouted chickpeas, birdie bread, and the dog food I was talking about. I know that's kind of late in the day, but I slept in because it's rainy out, and I suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder. For supper, I'm going to give them mash (oats, quinoa, buckwheat, etc.) with fresh blackberries in it, along with some fresh basil leaves to nibble on.
Back to top
Steptoe
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: Oct 06, 2004
Posts: 4529

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2017 10:07 am    Post subject:

Quote:
Apparently bentonite clay has been used for hundreds of years by aboriginals as a dietary supplement, for absorbing toxins, and for healing.


maybe so.. some species of parrots hang on clift faces of clay and eat it...
But in general I shudder at comments like that.. they A55-U & ME that because been used for 100s of yrs its good...

In NZ we have real meat grown on real grass paddocks and very strict laws on additives etc.. have to we export most of what we grow and has to meet offshore very high specs for thehigh grade meats etc.

Another thought.. many drugs. chemical can be used on animal.. eg flea drugs for cats and dogs, but banned for human use.. the primary reason is the long term effects.. we live ave 80+ yrs cats dogs 12/ 18yrs.

Kerosene is lamp oil/ paraffin oil not quite as refined.
Think about it, you get a serious wound, or burn, the put a dressing on.., the dressing is a paraffin wax mix.. same chemical just different molecular weight and melting point.

Grow light? what is the problem with a pot on the window sill?
most 'herbs are weeds , grow anywhere
Cape gooseberries... take up a bit of space..and bees to form fruit and need good conditions to ripen well..
We have a small patch growing seasonally wild next to the 3 bee hives.

I find cornstarch works fairly well to get the bleeding to stop
Quote:
flour cornstarch all work, absorb the moist quick , forms a artificial scab..[/i]
_________________
My Spelling is Not Incorrect...It's 'Creative'
Back to top
Michelle
Member
Member


Joined: Nov 22, 2017
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Sun Dec 03, 2017 10:33 am    Post subject:

Just a quick update: got the medication today, which is earlier than the estimated 4-6 Dec, gotta build up the 'courage' to apply it, cause I'm gonna do it by myself, no one to give a helping hand :) He's already stopped moulting as much and feathers are growing back and less scratching, however, I'll give it as prevention. He's gone to sleep now, but that's not gonna stop me :D Will update soon!
Back to top
Michelle
Member
Member


Joined: Nov 22, 2017
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Sun Dec 03, 2017 11:20 am    Post subject:

Was done in less than 5min. I only used the street lights to catch him :) He was still, only one slight bite before, but was fine when I applied it. He did loose some of his small "fluff" (I'm more used to dogs..:) ) growing on his chest and now he's using all the 'aggression' out on his toys, even though he's got the doors open to fly out :) Hope he didn't loose the little trust I had gained with him, but animals/birds move on quicker than the human animals :p
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Kakariki, Care, Breeding, Ecology, and Conservation Forum Index -> Vets Corner All times are GMT + 13 Hours
Page 1 of 1
Copy Paste Text Here to Translate
Select Language and Translate

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by PHPBulletinBoard © 2001-2008 phpBulletinBoard Group
PHPBulletinBoard port based on Tom Nitzschner's PHPBulletinBoard upgraded to PHPBulletinBoard 2.0.7
Standalone Developed Tested by: ChatServ, mikem,
and Paul Laudanski (aka Zhen-Xjell).

by Nuke Cops 2004




All Logos and Trademarks in this site are Property of their Respective Owners.
Statements and Views Expressed on this web site Represent the Opinions of the Authors.
Neither this Site or the Publishers of this Site Assume Any Liability for the Information Contained Herein.
ANY CONTENT from this Site can only be DISTRIBUTED/PUBLISHED/USED ELSEWHERE with PRIOR WRITTEN PERMISSION
ALL COMMENTS/PICTURES/CONTENT are the PROPERTY of the CONTRIBUTORS and 2004/2015 by WWW.KAKARIKI.NET

Web site engine's code is Copyright © 2003 by NukePortal. All Rights Reserved. NukePortal is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.
Page Generation: 0.561 Seconds